Perceptions of Police Legitimacy and Citizen Decisions to Report Hate Crime Incidents in Australia

  • Susann Wiedlitzka University of Sussex United Kingdom
  • Lorraine Mazerolle University of Queensland Australia
  • Suzanna Fay-Ramirez University of Queensland Australia
  • Toby Miles-Johnson Queensland University of Technology Australia

Abstract

This article examines the importance of perceptions of police legitimacy in the decision to report hate crime incidents in Australia. It addresses an identified gap in the literature by analysing the 2011-2012 National Security and Preparedness Survey (NSPS) results to not only explore differences between hate crime and non-hate crime reporting but also how individual characteristics and perceptions of legitimacy influence decisions about reporting crime to police. Using the NSPS survey data, we created three Generalised Linear Latent and Mixed Models (Gllamm), which explore the influence of individual characteristics and potential barriers on the decision to report crime/hate crime incidents to police. Our results suggest that hate crimes are less likely to be reported to police in comparison to non-hate crime incidents, and that more positive perceptions of police legitimacy and police cooperation are associated with the victim’s decision to report hate crime victimisation. 

Published
Jun 1, 2018
How to Cite
Wiedlitzka, S., Mazerolle, L., Fay-Ramirez, S., & Miles-Johnson, T. (2018). Perceptions of Police Legitimacy and Citizen Decisions to Report Hate Crime Incidents in Australia. International Journal For Crime, Justice And Social Democracy, 7(2), 91-106. DOI: 10.5204/ijcjsd.v7i2.489
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