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International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Queensland University of Technology 2202-8005 The International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is an open access, blind peer reviewed journal that publishes critical research about challenges confronting criminal justice systems around the world. Committed to Open Access  and democratising quality knowledge production and dissemination. FREE TO DOWNLOAD AND FREE TO PUBLISH!  http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

About the Journal

The International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is an open access, blind peer reviewed journal that publishes critical research about challenges confronting criminal justice systems around the world. Committed to democratising quality knowledge production and dissemination through FREE Open Access publishing. We also use Creative Commons copyright which allows authors to retain their own copyright and re-publish. 

Authors can submit and publish at no cost - there are no APCs (Article Processing Charges).

The Journal invites 6-8000 word original submissions. Authors are asked to register, read the guidelines, and agree to the ethics statement before submission. Turn around time for peer review is usually 4-6 weeks. Please review Author Guidelines prior to submission

In 2015, the Journal met the Scopus evaluation as a high quality international journal and is currently ranked in the Q2 quartile. 

International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is included in:

  • Scopus - the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature
  • ARC Excellence in Research Australia
  • Australian Policy Online (APO) - open access knowledge hub and information service providing easy access to policy and practice research and resources
  • DOAJ– an online directory that indexes and provides access to quality open access, peer-reviewed journals
  • EBSCO– EBSCOhost Research Databases
  • Google Scholar– a database that indexes websites and files of a scholarly nature
  • Paperity– a multidisciplinary aggregator of open access journals and papers
  • ProQuest –world’s largest, multidisciplinary full-text database
  • Trove(National Library of Australia) - an aggregation of metadata, and a growing repository of full text digital resources originally published and made publicly available in Australia
  • Ulrichsweb- Ulrich's™ is an authoritative source of bibliographic and publisher information on more than 300,00 periodicals of all types academic and scholarly journals
  • Web of Science (Emerging Sources Citation Index)- the world's largest collection of research data, publications, and patents.

 

The Justice Prize

The Justice Prize for Best Article International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy
The Justice Prize will be awarded annually for the best peer reviewed article, published in the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, that, in the opinion of the award committee, makes an outstanding original contribution to knowledge.

Award Committee Membership:
Chief Editors, Assistant Editor and two Members drawn from the International Editorial Board
The Chair will be drawn from the Editorial Team.

The Prize:
Winners of the Prize will be announced on the Journal web pages. The winner/s will receive $2000 scholarship toward attendance at the biennial Crime, Justice and Social Democracy conference where the award will be presented.

 

The Journal banner - The Roses March

In Oslo, Norway on 26 July 2011 around 100,000 people marched to mourn the slaughter of 77 victims murdered by Anders Breivik several days earlier. ‘Most people at the event carried a single red or white rose … The crowd raised their flowers together to Crown Prince Haakon, who said that '"tonight the streets are filled with love"’ (https://sputniknews.com/world/20110726165392120/). Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg also addressed crowds in Oslo saying: ‘By taking part, you are saying a resounding “yes” to democracy’. He said this was a ‘march for democracy, a march for tolerance, a march for unity’, adding: ‘Evil can kill a person but never conquer a people’ (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-14285020). This sentiment is what our banner, of single roses held high, symbolises.