Homegirls, Hoodrats and Hos: Co-constructing Gang Status through Discourse and Performance

  • Abigail Kolb Clayton State University
  • Ted Palys Simon Fraser University

Abstract

Despite a growing literature regarding female gang membership, little is known about the ways in which gang-affiliated women negotiate the boundaries of gang membership. The current study, based on semi-structured interviews with twenty-four formerly gang-affiliated Chicana women involved with a prominent gang prevention/intervention organization, sought to understand how these women negotiated their interactions and understood their identity within the gang. Findings suggest that these women and the gangs in which they operate recreate broader gender norms that affect their standing and social mobility within the gang.
Published
Dec 1, 2016
How to Cite
KOLB, Abigail; PALYS, Ted. Homegirls, Hoodrats and Hos: Co-constructing Gang Status through Discourse and Performance. International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, [S.l.], v. 5, n. 4, p. 29-44, dec. 2016. ISSN 2202-8005. Available at: <https://www.crimejusticejournal.com/article/view/334>. Date accessed: 28 july 2017. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5204/ijcjsd.v5i4.334.

Keywords

Chicana gangs; homegirls; gender performance; street socialization; identity construction; cholo subculture.
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