Perceptions of Safety Among Taxi and Rideshare Service Patrons: Gender, Safekeeping And Responsibilisation

Abstract

Rideshare and taxi services may commonly be perceived as safer modes of travel, particularly in comparison to public transport, and the introduction of rideshare services such as Uber has transformed urban mobilities. Yet, there is emerging anecdotal evidence to suggest that both taxi and rideshare services are sites of sexual harassment and violence. However, little is known about passengers’ perceptions of safety when using taxis and rideshare services, an issue with significant implications for mobility, civic participation and social inclusion. To address this gap, we explore findings from an online survey and one-on-one interviews with rideshare and taxi patrons to examine their perceptions of safety when using taxi and rideshare services and the factors that facilitate or impede feelings of safety, including the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic. In closing, we consider the implications of the findings for conceptualisations of safety, developing policy and practice, and future research.

Creative Commons License
Except where otherwise noted, content in this journal is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Published: 2022-04-20
Section:Online First
Fetching Scopus statistics
Fetching Web of Science statistics
How to Cite
Fileborn, B., Cama, E., & Young, A. (2022). Perceptions of Safety Among Taxi and Rideshare Service Patrons: Gender, Safekeeping And Responsibilisation. International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, 11(1). https://doi.org/10.5204/ijcjsd.2085
Article Keywords:

Author Biographies

The University of Melbourne
 Australia

Dr Bianca Fileborn is a DECRA research fellow and Senior Lecturer in Criminology in the School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Melbourne. 

The University of Melbourne
 Australia

Elena Cama is a Research Assistant in the School of Social and Political Sciences, The University of Melbourne. She is also a PhD Candidate and Research Officer at the Centre for Social Research in Health, University of New South Wales Sydney.

.

The University of Melbourne
 Australia

Alison Young is the Deputy Director of the Melbourne Centre for Cities, and the Francine V. McNiff Professor of Criminology in the School of Social & Political Sciences, University of Melbourne.