Can the Subaltern Speak in Criminology? Analysing the Production of Knowledge on Crimes of the Powerful in the 21st Century through Latin American Postcolonial Lenses

Abstract

Through postcolonial criminological lens, this article attempts to evidence the domination of knowledge in criminology of Crimes of the powerful in the Global North and Anglo-language countries, and whether this domination translates into an influence of knowledge in Latin America and the Caribbean in the 21st century. To address this, a scoping review search was developed to find research articles focused on Crimes of the powerful both globally and in Latin American countries, and a citation analysis performed on specific studies. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied as a search strategy. The results demonstrate that a high level of concentration exists in the production of knowledge of Crimes of the powerful studies in the Global North and Anglo-language countries compared to the Global South and non-Anglo-language countries, and also evidence the high level of influence of knowledge that Global North countries have on Latin American studies.

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Published: 2021-03-01
Pages:30 to 51
Section:Articles
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How to Cite
Valdés-Riesco, A. (2021). Can the Subaltern Speak in Criminology? Analysing the Production of Knowledge on Crimes of the Powerful in the 21st Century through Latin American Postcolonial Lenses. International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, 10(1), 30-51. https://doi.org/10.5204/ijcjsd.v10i1.1513

Author Biography

Centro de Estudios Justicia y Sociedad, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
 Chile

Amalia Valdés Riesco is a Sociologist of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and Master in Criminology from the University of Manchester. Currently she is a research coordinator at the Centro de Estudios Justicia y Sociedad of the Sociology Institute at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Her lines of research are related to prisons, social reintegration, access to Justice, white collar crimes and crimes of the powerful.